Sanmar, Kongsberg and RAL Rethink the Twin-Thruster Harbor Tug

Sanmar has ordered 20 thrusters for the TRAnsverse 2600, enough to build a series of 10 hulls. Kongsberg is supplying US205S fixed-pitch azimuth thrusters with a number of upgrades, including high performance gears and an uprated maximum RPM.

SHARE
FOLLOW Follow with Google News!

Sanmar Shipyards is getting ready to build a large series of next-gen harbor tugs with twin azimuth thrusters arranged fore and aft. The 60-tonne bollard pull tugs were designed by Robert Allan Ltd., and the propulsion arrangement has a conceptual resemblance to the firm's other high maneuverability fore-and-aft designs, the triple-thruster RotorTug and the twin Voith-drive RAVE.

RAL designed the unique new series for longtime client Svitzer, the global towage giant owned by Maersk.

The new TRAnsverse 2600 series will deliver higher maneuverability and steering forces compared to a conventional ASD tug, and was specifically designed around Svitzer's needs - including its long-term plans for decarbonization.

The tug's innovative design will feed into the new Maersk/Svitzer methanol-powered tug project, according to its developers.

Sanmar has ordered 20 thrusters for the TRAnsverse 2600, enough to build a series of 10 hulls.

Kongsberg is supplying US205S fixed-pitch azimuth thrusters with a number of upgrades, including high performance gears and an uprated maximum RPM.

In addition, Kongsberg is supplying a condition monitoring system, which will allow the customer to extend its drydocking period from five years to seven and a half years. This is a cost savings in itself; condition monitoring will also help reduce unplanned downtime by detecting mechanical issues early.

A built-in remote-control system will allow Kongsberg's technicians to access the vessel's electronics in order to carry out any needed diagnostics from afar.

"The TRAnsverse tug is set to form the basis for a carbon-neutral methanol fuel cell tug which is currently in development, and the future-proof design of our thrusters means they’re already good to go when newbuilds of this nature start to appear," said Tomi Venttola, Sales Manager – Propulsion & Engines for Kongsberg Maritime.

In November, AP Moller-Maersk announced that Svitzer would be introducing "the world’s first fuel cell tug boat for harbor towage operations" in its European operations by 2024.

The project will run on green methanol, like Maersk's next-generation container ships. "Fuel cells will be applicable for tugs earlier than for larger vessels and further, tugs are built significantly faster.

With this tug we get hands-on experience in deploying fuel cells as an alternative to diesel or pure electric power – it is a significant step in Svitzer’s ambition to lead the decarbonisation of towage and an important contribution to Maersk’s overall efforts within this agenda," said Ingrid Uppelschoten Snelderwaard, Global COO of Svitzer, in a statement last year.

SHARE NEWS:
OTHER NEWS